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The 3 Genealogy Mistakes You Have to Tame to Improve Your Skills

Do you want to further your genealogy skills so you can research better or faster? Have you run into a problem that seems too "difficult" for your current skill level?

Whatever reason you have for wanting to improve, there are three basic mistakes you have to tame before you can move "up."
There are three genealogy mistakes you must tame before your skills will improve. | The Occasional Genealogist #genealogy #familyhistory

Setting Genealogy Goals

As I write this (which is obviously well before you're reading it), there are three weekends until Christmas. Do you think it's time to start planning for the new year?
Five easy steps will help you identify and set genealogy goals for your research. If you're short on time, these steps are perfect for you. | The Occasional Genealogist #genealogy #familyhistory #researchplanning


As an Occasional Genealogist, someone that doesn't have a lot of time for their own family history research, setting genealogy goals for the new year is vital. I've created five steps just for Occasional Genealogists so you can do more genealogy next year.

  1. Previous year review
  2. Broad interest or goal identification
  3. Refining your interests/goals
  4. Correlating your previous year review with your refinements
  5. Finalizing your resolutions/goals

Deciding what you want to focus on and what kind of time you have available are a must if you want to do more genealogy. This post will cover each step and show you how easy it can be to set achievable genealogy goals or how to adjust when a goal isn't achievable.

Let's get started!


Evernote for Digitizing Genealogy Records

Do you want to bring home copies of genealogy records to reference later? This is a great strategy to save time at a repository you don't get to visit often or even to bring home finding aids.

Maybe you know there's something you don't know. Referring to a copy rather than just your own notes can help you learn more later.

Maybe you just like keeping a copy in addition to your notes. It's not a bad idea.

But paper copies can be expensive and a pain to manage. Digital's the way to go, right? But how do you digitize records when the repository doesn't give you an easy way? And then how do you manage your digital copies (that is, how do you file them and find them again).

In my previous post, I talked about options for DIY digitization and the extremely important considerations you need to make before investing in a scanner. You might want to read that post first, so you understand why I recommend this method instead of different equipment. I'll wait while you do.

How do you digitize records when the repository doesn't give you a way? How do you manage your digital copies? | The Occasional Genealogist #genealogy #familyhistory #Evernote #organizing


So let's dive into my method for DIY digitization.

Digitizing Genealogy Records: DIY

Last spring I wrote a post about subscription savings, digitizing records, and Evernote. It was actually a combo post of three topics/ideas that segued from one to the other but that I didn't think each had sufficient material for a post.

I'm more verbose than I thought. Now there are three posts.

Here is the "digitizing" content which stemmed from a reader question.

DIY the digitization of genealogy material. With the right tool for you, you can create digital images for your family history research. | The Occasional Genealogist

Why You Need a Genealogy To-do List

Deciding on the next action for a genealogy project can be exhausting. Is tiresome decision making keeping you from doing more genealogy or even doing any genealogy? | The Occasional Genealogist

Create a Genealogy To-do List


Can you say decision fatigue?

That phrase was actually the note I made to myself, so I'd know what this blog post title was really supposed to be about.

Is it what you expected? It's not what I expected the first time I opened the draft post after thinking of the title.

It IS the reason you need a genealogy to-do list. But I'm pretty sure I need to clarify what kind of to-do list I'm talking about.

Once we're done, you should know why you need a list and be ready to start one.
At the minimum, you should find these types of tasks on your list:
  • Planning
  • Research
  • Analyzing
  • Reporting
  • Education
  • Organization

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